NCEA - Catholic Distance Learning Network

Development of classroom instruction in research method through a network of information and research oriented assignments

Readings:

 

Badke, William. Teaching Research Processes: The Faculty Role in the Development of Skilled Student Researchers. Oxford: Chandos; New York: Neal-Schuman, 2012, Chapters Nine and Ten.

 

Background:  

The book, Teaching Research Processes, and the article, William Badke, "Student Theological Research as an Invitation," Theological Librarianship 5, no.1 (2012): 30-42. https://journal.atla.com/ojs/index.php/theolib/article/view/200/507, offer suggestions for ways in which the development of research processes could be made foundational to courses through options like introduction to the literature and methodology of the discipline, close reading of key literature, and modular research assignments that are assessed both for content and method by professors eager to offer support and guidance to developing researchers.

 

Some key questions that professors need to ask as they incorporated research processes development into their courses are these:

  1. What are the knowledge deficits of my students regarding the information base and method of my discipline?
  2. What concrete methods will I use to address those deficits?
  3. How can I translate the temptation to lecture about research processes into active learning opportunities to develop student research processes ability?

Research does not have to be an adjunct to instruction (thus separating what we are teaching from what students are producing).  Rather, instruction and research can be intertwined so that students become both active learners and participants in their disciplines.

 

Assignments:

  1. How did your experience of attempting research in a topic outside of your expertise speak into your understanding of what students face as they attempt seminary research?
  2. Create a guided student modular research assignment as described in Teaching Research Processes, p. 166ff. for a topic in your discipline and post it. 
  3. Post your thoughts on insights you have gained through this seminar.  Especially important is your view of the feasibility of teaching research processes within the foundations of your courses.

Last Updated April 20, 2017.  © Catholic Distance Learning Network.
"I'd always suspected that we were just teaching our students about our disciplines without ever inviting them to take ownership over them, but I always made a subconscious kind of excuse for my own complicity in that. This course in teaching research design calls all faculty to a higher standard on engaging students in how to enter into our disciplines." - Dr. Sebastian Mahfood, OP, Coordinator of the Catholic Distance Learning Network